FAQs: 2012 Ballot Initiatives

In the 2012 election cycle, a significant voting block of people of faith voted for the full equality and dignity of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people!

Our campaign focused on five states holding ballot initiatives concerning the dignity and equality of LGBT folks in 2012.

  1. North Carolina:  Unfortunately, on May 8th, North Carolina citizens voted to approve Amendment One, a constitutional amendment that not only bans same-sex marriage, but also bars legal recognition of any union besides marriage between one man and one woman, including civil unions and domestic partnerships for gay and straight couples.   
  2. Maine:  On November 6th, Maine citizens voted to (re)institute marriage equality!  Maine was actually the first state to pass marriage equality through its Legislature and have it signed by its governor, but it was quickly revoked via voter referendum.  This November, Maine had its second chance – and succeeded!  To learn more, check out Equality Maine's website
  3. Maryland:  Maryland's governor just signed marriage equality into law in March 2012. Then, voters had the ultimate say in a voter referendum this November – and they voted yes!
  4. MinnesotaOn November 6th, Minnesotans voted on whether or not to create a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage. The amendment did not pass! To learn more, check out Marriage Equality Minnesota's website.
  5. Washington:  Similar to Maryland, Washington citizens voted in November to endorse Washington State's newly passed marriage equality law!

Meet Jane and Pete-e. At 12:01 am on December 6th,
they made history in Washington state with their love. 

 

Each One, Move One Pledge | Films of Courage: Love Free or Die & Others

Resources | FAQs:  2012 Ballot Initiatives  | National Partners


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